The first wristwatchThe first wristwatch

The logic of putting a manual winding watch on an automatic watch winder.




I do not know if I am the only one guilty of what appears at first to be a most useless habit. A habit wherein I dutifully wind my hand winds and then, lo and behold, stick the poor souls on a winder along with my few automatic watches. I can almost hear the poor watch say, stop , stop you numbskull, I am not to be confused with a self winding, commonplace contraption that requires no attention from you for days at end; nor can I benefit from whirling on and off constantly.
But I think there is some logic in this but do correct me if I am wrong. I understand that hand wound movements are adjusted for accuracy in various positions and that hand wound watches, just like their self winding bretheren, gain or lose a few seconds more or less per day depending on their position. The daily wearing of a watch exposes the watch to various different positions and so during the average day an average mechanical watch is more or less quite accurate. In the resting state, unless you know the position in which your watch is most likely to gain or lose the least time, you are most likely to see a greater variation in accuracy. An automatic watch, if placed on a winder, instead of for example, on the bedside table, therefore benefits not only from being wound but also by being exposed to the various positions as it turns and comes to rest at a different position after the winder starts and stops every few minutes. This movement and then the coming to rest of the winder at different positions is something that a manual wound watch can benefit from as well. Of course it will need to be wound every day by hand.
Do any of you good people do this, for this reason? I am certain that some must. For what it is worth, I have seen that my hand winds are more accurate when they are placed on the winder than when they are left in a single position when not being worn.
--------------
live and let live

^_^:
Is a movement that sensitive?

^_^:

live and let live

^_^:
Don't even know where my rotation is. :-)

^_^:
I think your kookoo for coco puffs man. ;-)

^_^:
...your wrist must be rotating counterclockwise as you sleep. With the Rolex, it is probably alternating cw to ccw :-).
You must have really sore wrists when you wake up!
live and let live

^_^:
But seriously, do you not see any logic in what I have said about the manual wind on an auto winder?
live and let live

^_^:
I do exactly the same..., if you are a collector and can not wear all your manuals and
automatics at the same time it is logic that you take advantage of the winders, with my 5970 G it gave me good results, as i had the problem of the watch stopping after midnight even when i winded the watch 4 hours before...

^_^:
I can think of one other advantage: greater distribution of the lubricants...
Richard S

^_^:

live and let live

^_^:

There is no pleasure worth forgoing for an extra three years in the geriatric ward.

^_^:
no my friend, I do not... I don't put my reverso duo on a winder. I understand your logic, but don't think it's necessary..
Your patek is a few seconds fast or slow anyway. They don't have a zero set or even the ability to stop the second hand like your rolex so it's an imprecise instrument to some degree, and that's just the nature of it. If you lose or gain a minute or 2 while in the sitting position, just adjust it when you wind it.
Keep in mind.. it's called a "winder"

^_^:
Your question is a sound one, and not at all obscure. However, the logic of the premise is, indeed, flawed.
Mechanical movements have an inherent inaccuracy, and with all variables maintained in the same state, the timing accuracy will drift in a consistent fashion. For example, if your watch has a tendency to run fast by 2 seconds each day when in a flat position with crystal facing up (as when placed on the night stand), then in 2 days the inaccuracy will be 4 seconds, in 3 days it will be off by 6 seconds, etc. In the parlance of the Calculus, the error is integrated over time. The area under the curve of error plotted against time will increase in a linear fashion.
Now, if, hypothetically, placing the watch in a vertical orientation with gravity slowed the watch by 2 seconds a day, then one could compensate for the aforementioned inaccuracy by placing the watch in a vertical orientation each evening. The gravity-induced slowing would compensate for the inherent fast rate of the watch. With me so far?
By placing the watch on the winder, one essentially cancels out the effect of gravity (assuming the winder performs a random settling each few minutes). In so doing, the winder has exposed the fundamental inaccuracy built in to this particular movement. This is precisely what a Tourbillion accomplishes. The difference is that the Tourbillion can be set precisely against a standard, and then gravity is eliminated as a variable. In your case, the inaccuracy remains and you have eliminated gravity's ability to help compensate for the error.
The best way to help gravity improve the accuracy of your watch is to place it in the same position each evening for a number of days. Determine whether it runs fast or slow. Then change the position by 90 degrees for a few days and see if it compensates for the previous error. If the errors cancel each other out, you have accomplished what you set out to do. If not, that is, if the magnitude is not the same but the directions are opposite (one position is fast, the other position is slow), then tilt the watch by 45 degrees to adjust the magnitude of error.
Your idea is good, but examining it a little further leads to the conclusion that the winder thwarts your effort to achieve a more accurate timepiece.
Jim S.

^_^:
This is definitely a new one on me; makes sense but I think I see the rationale in what jselevan is pointing out as well. I always just hand wound my manual watches everyday whether I wore them or not. I never noticed any rate accuracy increases decreases whether I wore them or wound them and did not wear them.